How Many People Are Usually in Alcohol Classes for DUI?

After a DUI, you may be required to attend alcohol classes and addiction treatment. Even if you don’t have a substance abuse problem, attending these meetings will keep you out of jail and give you some valuable information that may help you understand what led you to make the decision to drive under the influence in the first place.

DUI school requirements vary by state and even by case; alcohol education classes are held in a group setting. Class sizes are usually limited to no more than 12 to 15 people depending on the level.

DUI Class Levels

Drug education courses are classified into different levels, and each offender is assigned to one depending on their age and the extent of their crime. Minors under the age of 21 are usually assigned to level I, which consists of a 12-hour alcohol class. Adults are rarely assigned to level I classes unless they are a first-time offender or their blood-alcohol level was under .10.

Typically, anyone over the age of 21 is assigned to level II DUI classes, which combine alcohol and drug education with mandated therapy. Some of these programs are held in three-hour sessions once a week for three months for a total of 36 hours while others might be longer.

Repeat offenders may be required to take an 18- or 30-month program that includes educational classes and therapy. The exact details and duration of your alcohol class will depend on your case, but you can expect weekly meetings that last for several hours at a time and take place in a group setting.

How Many People Attend Alcohol Awareness Classes?

Most classes do not exceed 12 members for each class, but some states allow DUI education programs to teach up to 15 students at once. Working in a relatively small group ensures that you will be able to receive the education you need to truly gain valuable knowledge from the experience. No one is happy about being sentenced to a DUI class, but try to approach it with a positive mindset. A mistake may have brought you here, but you have the chance to gain a new perspective and improve yourself going forward.

Most classes will cover the basics of alcohol intoxication, but you should also pay close attention to discussions about alcohol abuse and warning signs you have a drinking problem. Many people do not begin to realize the harmful role alcohol plays in their life until they’ve been arrested and charged with a DUI.

What to Expect in the DUI Class

Group discussions are a large part of the course; learning from others’ experience is valuable for several reasons. First, you may be able to think of your own actions differently when you hear about someone else’s reasons for drinking and driving. Second, by learning how to listen and share experiences without judgment or defense, you become more self-aware and compassionate.

Ultimately, the purpose of an alcohol class is to prevent people from getting another DUI in the future. Does everyone learn their lesson? Unfortunately, no. Many people will continue to believe that they were perfectly capable of driving and get behind the wheel again.

Others may drink and drive again only to wind up in an accident that seriously injures or kills them or other people. The risk you face whenever you drink and drive is never wroth it, no matter how capable you may think you are or how many times you’ve done it in the past.

Do DUI Classes Count as Court-Ordered Rehab?

No, alcohol classes are not a substitute for alcohol addiction treatment. Substance abuse often plays a factor in people’s DUIs, but educational classes do not offer the in-depth, personalized care necessary for treatment. Alcohol awareness classes are group-oriented, but they don’t provide medical treatment or psychological counseling.

If you’ve been ordered to receive treatment for a drinking problem, then rehab should be done at an inpatient or outpatient facility with detox services to help you get your life back on track.

To learn more about DUI classes, support meetings and alcohol rehabs, call us today at 833-762-3764. We’re happy to answer any questions you may have and give you the resources you need to make the right choices for your future. Whether you’ve only recently developed a drinking problem or been struggling in secret for years, now is the time to get the help you deserve.